Red Boler Day 1 to 10

This Boler was a just luck, I needed a utility trailer for another project, so searching kijji for really cheap utility trailer, and this popped up.  Way too nice to pass up I bought it sight unseen, then a week or so later I made the 90 minute drive to pick it up.

This project took a few months to complete, mostly because I worked on it over the summer, and we spent 5 weeks away camping in our green 1974 Boler.  I still broke the project down by days, taking 22 days of actual work to complete.  I am sure I could do it faster next time 🙂

Day 1

Another 74 Boler

Another 74 Boler

Picking up the Boler was a surprising day.  The trailer had been fixed up 20 years ago, before being parked outside and not moved since.  With this I expected the frame to have issues and was unsure if it could be towed home safely.

Using a cable pulley we pulled it out of the dirt (the wheels an tongue jack had sunk in over the years), then wheeled it over to the car.  I bolted the licence plate on (with rust free bolts that were still on the back), checked the frame which was not only solid, but not original, as the original frames where under built and usually need to be replaced.  That in itself made the trailer purchase worth the cost and trip.

I checked the lights on the trailer, and they mostly worked (it turned out later the tail light converter box in my car had failed over the winter).   The bearings looked good, and the tires looked brand new (although the tires had sat in the dirt for 20 years and would be replaced to make it safe later).

Checking the safety chains, the pulled off, so luckily I was able to borrow a chain from the seller, and make it safe for the trip home.

Overall the trailer was in great shape.  The top paint was showing signs of sun damage, and the inside showed and smelled of dampness.  With all the parts there it was going to make a great project.

Getting it home I washed the outside, and removed the roof vent so it would fit in the garage.  The small roof vent that is normally found on these trailers had been removed for a larger and taller option, otherwise it would have fit in the garage with the vent on.

Inside Picture

Inside Picture

Boler washed up

Boler washed up

Another inside picture

Another inside picture

Old power vent fan

Old power vent fan

1974 boler red project interior

1974 boler project kitchen

Day 2

This is the fast step, tearing it apart.  It looks like the floor of this trailer was cut out, and the trailer was rebuilt right on the new frame.  this made a few things a bit more difficult (like removing the closet).

Furniture Stripped out

Furniture Stripped out

Day 3

Cleaning, with the inside stripped it was time to clean, not my favorite part.  First I cleaned with bleach, but in a move to procrastinate I went to the internet to find a better solution, scrubbing bubbles, and it worked well.  A least 10 times faster it was worth a trip to the store.

The color changed dramatically with the cleaning, but I forgot to take a picture before painting.

 

Day 4

Parts of the ensolite had been painted before, so painting all of it seemed like the best way to make it all look the same.

Paint I used on the ensolite.

Paint I used on the ensolite.

I also started laying the laminate flooring, a little early for that though.  Still forgetting the camera inside.

Day 5

Even though the trailer lights were working I decided to replace the wiring and add marker lights.  I used a trailer wiring kit from walmart (had a lower price than anywhere else locally) and just ran a ground wire with it.

I also made some repairs to the fiberglass furniture.  I usually use a standard fiberglass resign, but wanted to test out ecopoxy.  this product was amazing (although you do pay more for it), no smell and so much easier to work with.

I also sanded down the furniture, as it had been painted before, I plan to paint it again to clean it up.

Fiberglass resin alternative

Fiberglass resin alternative

I removed the screws and wood holding it together and added epoxy and fiberglass to the back.

I removed the screws and wood holding it together and added epoxy and fiberglass to the back.

Now it just needs to be filled and sanded

Now it just needs to be filled and sanded

Day 6

Sanding the top exterior of the shell.  Not much to discuss, lots of dust.

Day 7

Sanding and then more sanding.  The paint came off fairly easy, with only a few places with silicone on the paint making it difficult.

Silicone should never, never touch these little trailers.  At the suggestion left on one of my posts, I later tried silicon remover I picked up at Home Depot.  It is amazing stuff and would have worked well here.

I also taped off the front to paint on the rubberized paint I planed to use for the rock guard.

Sanded and ready to paint

Sanded and ready to paint

I planned to paint using the roll and tip method.  After a quick test I realized it wasn’t going to work for me, although it looks easy I was messing it up somewhere.  Instead I used an ultra smooth roller from home depot and applied two coats of primer.

The other trailer I sprayed, this one I roller.  Rolling was easier, less of a mess and cost less, plus 2 coats put a lot more paint on than 3 coats with the spray.  At my skill level the spray paint job on the green trailer was better, but the difference was so small, and you had to get so close to inspect to notice the difference I will be rolling next time for sure.   I would just buy a few rollers, and not try and reuse any, as when I attempted to reuse a roller the next day the result was a little bumpy as somehow it was leaving bubbles??

Two coats of primer, it is looking good.

Two coats of primer, it is looking good.

Day 8

I took most of this day off, but did spend a couple hours sanding the door (which I forgot to sand and primmer the day before.).

Day 9

I got out the bondo and filled some marks in the fiberglass furniture, as well and repaired and filled holes I didn’t want.

repairing the boler fiberglass furnature with bondo

Fixing marks on the door

Fixing marks on the door

Filling light switch holes

Filling light switch holes

I took a break from working on the trailer to run out and buy some foam for the bunk beds and a fridge.  Instead of making dinette cushions, I decided to take the red ones I got for the green Boler at the end of last year and put them in the red Boler.

I then primed these and the door I missed priming the day before.

The rest of the day I worked on cutting the foam for our bed in the Green Boler, to replace the cushions I will be using for this trailer.

 

Day 10

I put two coats of white paint on the top of the Boler and the door (the door was previously two tone).  I had white paint left over from when I painted the Green trailer the year before.

I also used some industrial leaf spring paint (it rubber, flexible paint that stops rust), To paint the frame and the rock guard.

Rock guard still needs another coat

Rock guard still needs another coat

Top painted white, bumper Black

Top painted white, bumper Black

 

I then used the top bunk as a template to cut the foam for the bunks out (for both the green and red trailer).  I have heard an electric knife works well, but I don’t have one, so a bread knife did the job just fine.

I used a knife from the kitchen to cut the foam

I used a knife from the kitchen to cut the foam

I used the wood from the top bunk as a template

I used the wood from the top bunk as a template

See next page

2 comments


  1. Amy

    What type of paint did you use?

    • admin

      I used a plastic enamel I picked up from industrial plastics, a fiberglass and plastic supply store. I have pictures of the paint under the green boler rebuild.

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